food insecurity

 

On this week’s  Valley Edition: We continue our series Escape From Mammoth Pool, about the dramatic rescues of hundreds of campers during the first days of the Creek Fire.

Plus, young filmmakers in Bakersfield document food insecurity in Kern County.   

And how you can attend this year’s Dark Sky festival from your own backyard. Listen to these stories and more in the podcast above. 

 

TYM4Change

 

Why is food insecurity so common in Kern County, and what can people do to solve it? Those two questions are at the core of a new documentary called "INVISIBLE: The Unseen Faces of Hunger." The film was produced by members of Transitional Youth Mobilizing for Change, also known as TYM4Change, a nonprofit that creates opportunities for young people to address issues in their community. Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with its executive director, Dixie King, along with two of the young filmmakers, Nicholas Hulsey and R. Amaya. 

 

The Fresno Center Instagram

The clock is ticking for CARES Act grants, which are set to run out at the end of the month. In Fresno, these funds helped to finance the COVID-19 Equity Project, a network of community based organizations providing COVID assistance to vulnerable communities.

Fresno American Indian Health Project

While reports show that the COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately affects communities of color, gaps in data have made it difficult to quantify the impact of the virus on indigenous populations. To get a better sense of how Native Americans in the Valley are faring during the pandemic, Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with Selina De La Peña, CEO of the Fresno American Indian Health Project.

Alice Daniel / KVPR

 

 

Outside the Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Fresno, volunteers unload boxes of ribbed sinqua from a farmer’s pickup truck.  

“All right they’re all good to go,” a young man says. “All of it?” another volunteer asks as he and others line up to carry the boxes of vegetables inside.

 

Every Neighborhood Partnership Facebook

When COVID-19 struck, Every Neighborhood Partnership teamed up with local agencies in the Valley to expand food distribution, provide access to diapers and formula, and help struggling families make ends meet. Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with the Fresno-based organization’s executive director, Artie Padilla, about his approach to community service. He says he focuses on what’s working in a community, rather than on what is broken.

Central California Food Bank

COVID-19, and the stay-at-home directives enacted to minimize its spread, have led to a shocking decline in employment. For many, the loss of wages means an increased reliance on food distribution centers. The Central California Food Bank works with churches, community centers and schools to distribute food in Fresno, Madera, Kings, Kern and Tulare counties. Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with the non-profit’s Chief Operations Officer Natalie Caples about how the coronavirus has escalated the Valley’s hunger crisis. 

MIT Press

Hunger is a big problem across America but especially here in the San Joaquin Valley. One of the local groups taking on the issue is FoodLink of Tulare County. The Exeter-based organization is dedicated to bridging the gap between between health and anti-hunger relief efforts.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

A new survey of food insecurity in some of Fresno's poorest neighborhoods is shedding light on a problem that plagues much of the valley. On Valley Edition we talked to Philip Erro, the driving force behind the new "Fresno Hunger Count" project, and Andy Souza of the Community Food Bank. Souza says the new data may help local organizations like his be more proactive in meeting the needs of those who go hungry, rather than simply being reactive.