All Things Considered

Weekdays from 3:30 p.m. -6:30 p.m.

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - some. On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the five decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa ChangAudie CornishMary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

Ways to Connect

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

NPR Music has song recommendations for everything from annual holidays to life's major milestones. But before you celebrate, you might need to clean the bathroom. For that, you need distraction. You need inspiration. You need a playlist. Stephen Thompson and Cyrena Touros from NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour have you covered.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Boo! Where are the Halloween costumes?

19 hours ago

Copyright 2021 WMFE. To see more, visit WMFE.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

So much ails Congress these days - disagreements over President Biden's domestic agenda and the January 6 insurrection. Well, NPR's Barbara Sprunt found some unexpected bipartisan cooperation brewing on Capitol Hill over beer.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

August 7, 2019 changed the lives of many undocumented immigrants living and working in central Mississippi. That day, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents arrested 680 people working at chicken processing plants there. It was one of the largest immigration raids in U.S. history. "Latino USA" host Maria Hinojosa has been reporting on the aftermath. She and producer Reynaldo Leanos Jr. recently returned to these Mississippi communities to report on the impact of the pandemic and the aftermath of these raids. They both join us now. Welcome.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Fans of the television series The Great British Bake Off have long marveled at the skill contestants show during the dreaded "technical challenge" — for which they are given a basket with all the ingredients needed to make a highly unusual dish but a set of instructions that are often as vague as, "Bake until ready." Now a team of scientists at a pharmaceutical startup in South Africa is essentially confronting the same type of test — except the stakes are life and death.

Copyright 2021 WBHM 90.3 FM. To see more, visit WBHM 90.3 FM.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 KCRW. To see more, visit KCRW.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Many wealthy countries have vaccinated more than half of their populations. In Africa, just 5% of people have gotten the full dose. Advocates for greater access say a major reason is that African nations have to rely on manufacturers on other continents, where they have little clout. Now a pharmaceutical startup in South Africa has been enlisted in an effort to change that. NPR's Nurith Aizenman reports.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Wildlife biologist Greg LeClair has been obsessed with amphibians since he was a kid, when one rainy day, a black and yellow spotted salamander stumbled into his driveway in Maine.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Basically no one picked the Chicago Sky to win the WNBA title when the playoffs started last month. The Sky barely broke even in the regular season, so they were a long shot, to say the least. But last night on ESPN, the Chicago Sky wrapped up a month of proving just about everyone wrong.

Pages