Fresno State

Kathleen Schock

Following the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, African Americans gained access to professional and educational opportunities never before available. However, coverage of those success stories was largely ignored by traditional media outlets. That’s why six young friends in Fresno set out to create Grapevine Magazine, a publication that from 1969 to 1982 shared the life and style of prominent African Americans in the Valley. An exhibition at the Henry Madden Library at Fresno State honors the magazine.

This week on Young Artists Spotlight, we  welcome vocal performers from Fresno State, as well as Dr. Maria Briggs and Dr. Cari Earnhart. In addition to the performances, Briggs and Earnhart will discuss the upcoming Fresno Art Song Festival (Feb 29) and the CSUF Carmina Burana gala (Mar 13-15).

Performers:

Jordan Pulido - Ночь (Night) Op. 44 No. 1 - Anton Rubinstein 

Zueignung Op 10 No. 1 - Richard Strauss

Aunika Bull -  Sweet Suffolk Owl by Richard Hundley (1619) 

V’adoro Pupille by George Frideric Handel 

This week on Young Artists Spotlight, we welcome music students from California State University, Fresno. Each of the three student musicians will perform with collaborative pianist Dr. Shing-Ming Liao. Soloists this week include Amanda Steinhauer, xylophone; Robert Bennett - clarinet; and Arianna Knee, flute. Matthew Darling, Fresno State Music Department chair, also joins host David Aus this week to help introduce artists and to talk about their Carmina Burana gala taking place in March and Art Song Festival, happening later this month. 

Department of Pesticide Regulation Youtube Page

Pesticide regulations can be tough to understand, especially among communities that don’t speak English. Recently, however, with the help of local ag advisors and video production students at Fresno State, California’s Department of Pesticide Regulations released a series of how-to videos about pesticides in Hmong.

Lisa Lee Herrick

Lisa Lee Herrick reads from her recent essay Eating Thirty In Fresno: Finding Home At Hmong New Year  in the online publication Boom California and talks with FM89’s news director Alice Daniel about why so many Hmong refugees came to Fresno after the CIA’s secret war in Laos under the guidance of their leader General Vang Pao and why decades later, the city’s Hmong New Year is still a global draw.

Monica Velez / Valley Public Radio

Alfredo Gonzalez, 42, sat down in the Project Rebound office at Fresno State on a Wednesday morning. He was there to register for a two-day criminal justice class that would count for one unit toward his bachelor’s degree. 

 

“Although I’m at (Fresno) City I’ve been part of Project Rebound since before I got out of prison,” he said. The program helps formerly incarcerated people go to college and graduate. 

 

Faith in the Valley

Thousands of people in Fresno County are evicted from their homes every year.

Monica Velez / Valley Public Radio

Preschoolers played with a robot in the hallway outside of their classroom at the Huggins Early Education Center at Fresno State. They chased it and laughed as it rolled down the long corridor.

 

Most of the parents of these kids are students at Fresno State. Brittney Randolph, program director for the Huggins Center, said 70 percent of the slots are set aside for students, and having the center on campus can be really beneficial.   

 

fresnostate.edu website

Fresno State announced Wednesday that its Master of Science in Nursing has lost its accreditation, a first for the degree program since it was established in 1968. It’s also the university’s first program to ever lose its accreditation, and it follows less than a year after the nursing school learned that one of its certificate programs had never been accredited in the first place.

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

It’s clear that some non-profits, also called community benefit organizations, can really change a place through advocacy and education. However, keeping those organizations going is often dependent on gifts, grants, and fundraising.

Fresno State’s Humanics Program teaches students about philanthropy, leadership and how to run a CBO. Yesterday was the annual Students4Giving presentation -- students awarded three $5,000 grants to CBOs in the Central Valley.

© 1978 George Ballis/Take Stock

Adios Amor tells the story of one woman who should have made it into the history books but didn't. Maria Moreno was the first female farm worker to be hired as a union organizer.

 

Originally from Texas, Moreno lived with her husband and 12 children working in the fields. She was an indigenous woman with only a second-grade education but used her voice to rally support for farm workers' rights. 

 

Courtesy of Anthony Radford

This weekend, Fresno State’s Music Department will be performing the opera, “Madama Butterfly.” The hundred-year-old show is about the convoluted marriage of an American naval officer and  a Japanese geisha known as Madama Butterfly.

To learn more about the performance, and navigating racial stereotypes, we sat down with director and producer Anthony Radford, chorus master Cari Earnhart, and voice coach Maria Okunev Briggs. Okunev Briggs also plays the title role of Madama Butterfly.

On this week’s Valley Edition: There’s no summer school for kids in Bakersfield this year. We ask the superintendent why not. Plus, a new report details the poor living conditions of detention centers in California, but some immigration attorneys say keeping Mesa Verde open in Bakersfield is a good thing.

And later, one of the longest running fringe festivals is happening right now in Fresno. We talk to the founder of Rogue Fest, and hear from some of the performers.

Fresno State

In 2018, a Gallup poll reported that 45 percent of Americans trusted mass media to report the news accurately and fairly. That’s up from an all-time low of 32 percent in 2016, but still far lower than the levels of trust in the 1990s.

Kerry Klein / Valley Public Radio

In Fresno County, around 10 percent of all babies are born before 37 weeks of gestation. That’s higher than the national average, and among the highest of all California counties. For African-Americans, the numbers are even more concerning: From 2013 to 2015, black babies were 63 percent more likely to be born premature than white babies. But a new program in Fresno is trying to bring those numbers down by teaching women not just about health, but also about leadership and advocacy.

Kerry Klein / Valley Public Radio

When you think of Instagram celebrities, the Kardashians and performers like Beyonce probably come to mind. But with the Instagram handle @PhysicsFun, one of Fresno’s own scientists recently reached a million followers. He has almost as many as the astronaut Scott Kelly, and even more than celebrity astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Courtesy of Don Simmons

Thanksgiving can make us think about how to give back -- maybe it’s serving food at a homeless shelter or donating canned goods. But what about the rest of the year? I spoke with Don Simmons, a longtime community organizer and professor in the Humanics program at Fresno State about the prevailing needs in the Central Valley and how to get involved.  

Listen to the interview above to hear Simmons talk about the Humanics program, and how to find ways to better serve your own community. In his words, it can be as simple as taking a walk and talking to people.

Fresno State College of Arts and Humanities

We’re remembering Peter Everwine, an acclaimed Central Valley writer who died last month, by looking back at his poetry. Everwine taught English literature and creative writing at Fresno State for 29 years. He was the recipient of an esteemed Guggenheim Fellowship as well as a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Everwine died in Fresno on October 28, 2018 at the age of 88.  

Monica Velez

On election day, some students can get extra credit if they show teachers their “I Voted” sticker. Others post selfies on social media with the hashtag #IVotedSelfie. Some people drop off their mail-in ballots just to get the sticker.

But, why? What does it mean?

 

Fresno State student Charie Payne says she likes wearing it, especially as an African American woman.  

 

Fresno State / Official Facebook Account

College has become more expensive over the years, but students have managed by taking out loans or working in addition to their studies. Recent reporting from Larry Gordon at Edsource, an online media outlet that focuses on education in California, says that working too many hours can make it even harder for students to graduate on time.

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