Fresno State

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As coronavirus cases are surging, so are reports of depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. But even as mental health professionals are needed more than ever, those who graduated from one Fresno State nursing program are being told to return to school.

 

Estevan Parra

June is Pride month, but this year the worldwide event will largely be celebrated virtually in light of COVID-19. To learn more about the impact of the pandemic on the LGBTQ community, FM89's Kathleen Schock spoke to Estavan Parra, the LGBTQ and gender coordinator for the Cross Cultural and Gender Center at Fresno State.

Courtesy of Diana Vidales

Over the next month, many students will be graduating from college, but without the traditional pomp and circumstance or cap and gown. So we asked two students and their mothers about missing out on this once-in-a-lifetime experience, and what songs come to mind when they reflect on their journey.  

We spoke to Greyson Canterbury and his mom Kim Canterbury who live in Visalia. Greyson is a Fresno State Dean’s Medalist and is planning to go to Sri Lanka as a Peace Corps Volunteer, though the COVID-19 pandemic has delayed those plans.  

Fresno State

Nursing facilities have been hit hard by coronavirus outbreaks, and have changed visitor policies to reduce the spread of the disease. So how can older adults still maintain social connections? 

Helen Miltiades, director of Fresno State’s Gerontology Program, says families are visiting their older relatives at nursing homes by standing outside and waving at them through the safety of a window. 

Fresno State history professor Ethan Kytle has been reviewing news reports about a pandemic, but not this one. He’s been reading the Fresno Morning Republican. That’s the newspaper that covered the Spanish Flu in 1918.

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

The Fresno County Public Health lab was damaged in a flood back in 2019, so the county was sending its potential COVID-19 specimen to Tulare County’s Public Health Lab for analysis. But a partnership with Fresno State now means Fresno County will be able to process tests locally. 

 

Standing outside of the Jordan Agricultural Research Center, Fresno State President Joseph Castro announced that the center will become a testing facility for COVID-19. 

 

Courtesy of Angela Christiano

We recently asked a few students for audio postcards about how the pandemic is affecting them. Today, we’re going to hear Selma High School senior Mia Salinas who says she’s missing out on prom, her final season of track, and the chance to say good bye to her teachers and friends.

We also hear from Fresno State student Julianna Mazziliano. She’s in her second semester as a liberal studies major and works two jobs, both of which have cut hours due to the pandemic. She says she “didn’t pay $7,000 a year at Fresno State to just sit at home.” 

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Nearly two weeks after the coronavirus forced Fresno State to transition to virtual instruction, FM 89's Kathleen Schock spoke to Bryan Berrett, Fresno State's director of the Center for Faculty Excellence, about how students and faculty are adapting.  

Kathleen Schock

Following the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, African Americans gained access to professional and educational opportunities never before available. However, coverage of those success stories was largely ignored by traditional media outlets. That’s why six young friends in Fresno set out to create Grapevine Magazine, a publication that from 1969 to 1982 shared the life and style of prominent African Americans in the Valley. An exhibition at the Henry Madden Library at Fresno State honors the magazine.

This week on Young Artists Spotlight, we  welcome vocal performers from Fresno State, as well as Dr. Maria Briggs and Dr. Cari Earnhart. In addition to the performances, Briggs and Earnhart will discuss the upcoming Fresno Art Song Festival (Feb 29) and the CSUF Carmina Burana gala (Mar 13-15).

Performers:

Jordan Pulido - Ночь (Night) Op. 44 No. 1 - Anton Rubinstein 

Zueignung Op 10 No. 1 - Richard Strauss

Aunika Bull -  Sweet Suffolk Owl by Richard Hundley (1619) 

V’adoro Pupille by George Frideric Handel 

This week on Young Artists Spotlight, we welcome music students from California State University, Fresno. Each of the three student musicians will perform with collaborative pianist Dr. Shing-Ming Liao. Soloists this week include Amanda Steinhauer, xylophone; Robert Bennett - clarinet; and Arianna Knee, flute. Matthew Darling, Fresno State Music Department chair, also joins host David Aus this week to help introduce artists and to talk about their Carmina Burana gala taking place in March and Art Song Festival, happening later this month. 

Department of Pesticide Regulation Youtube Page

Pesticide regulations can be tough to understand, especially among communities that don’t speak English. Recently, however, with the help of local ag advisors and video production students at Fresno State, California’s Department of Pesticide Regulations released a series of how-to videos about pesticides in Hmong.

Lisa Lee Herrick

Lisa Lee Herrick reads from her recent essay Eating Thirty In Fresno: Finding Home At Hmong New Year  in the online publication Boom California and talks with FM89’s news director Alice Daniel about why so many Hmong refugees came to Fresno after the CIA’s secret war in Laos under the guidance of their leader General Vang Pao and why decades later, the city’s Hmong New Year is still a global draw.

Monica Velez / Valley Public Radio

Alfredo Gonzalez, 42, sat down in the Project Rebound office at Fresno State on a Wednesday morning. He was there to register for a two-day criminal justice class that would count for one unit toward his bachelor’s degree. 

 

“Although I’m at (Fresno) City I’ve been part of Project Rebound since before I got out of prison,” he said. The program helps formerly incarcerated people go to college and graduate. 

 

Faith in the Valley

Thousands of people in Fresno County are evicted from their homes every year.

Monica Velez / Valley Public Radio

Preschoolers played with a robot in the hallway outside of their classroom at the Huggins Early Education Center at Fresno State. They chased it and laughed as it rolled down the long corridor.

 

Most of the parents of these kids are students at Fresno State. Brittney Randolph, program director for the Huggins Center, said 70 percent of the slots are set aside for students, and having the center on campus can be really beneficial.   

 

fresnostate.edu website

Fresno State announced Wednesday that its Master of Science in Nursing has lost its accreditation, a first for the degree program since it was established in 1968. It’s also the university’s first program to ever lose its accreditation, and it follows less than a year after the nursing school learned that one of its certificate programs had never been accredited in the first place.

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

It’s clear that some non-profits, also called community benefit organizations, can really change a place through advocacy and education. However, keeping those organizations going is often dependent on gifts, grants, and fundraising.

Fresno State’s Humanics Program teaches students about philanthropy, leadership and how to run a CBO. Yesterday was the annual Students4Giving presentation -- students awarded three $5,000 grants to CBOs in the Central Valley.

© 1978 George Ballis/Take Stock

Adios Amor tells the story of one woman who should have made it into the history books but didn't. Maria Moreno was the first female farm worker to be hired as a union organizer.

 

Originally from Texas, Moreno lived with her husband and 12 children working in the fields. She was an indigenous woman with only a second-grade education but used her voice to rally support for farm workers' rights. 

 

Courtesy of Anthony Radford

This weekend, Fresno State’s Music Department will be performing the opera, “Madama Butterfly.” The hundred-year-old show is about the convoluted marriage of an American naval officer and  a Japanese geisha known as Madama Butterfly.

To learn more about the performance, and navigating racial stereotypes, we sat down with director and producer Anthony Radford, chorus master Cari Earnhart, and voice coach Maria Okunev Briggs. Okunev Briggs also plays the title role of Madama Butterfly.

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