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Alice Daniel

News Director

Alice Daniel is News Director for Valley Public Radio. Daniel has a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and more than 25 years of experience as a print and radio journalist.

As a correspondent for KQED’s The California Report, Daniel covered the Central Valley from Stockton to Bakersfield and beyond.

In addition to her broadcast and newspaper work, Daniel has been a lecturer in the Department of Media, Communications and Journalism at Fresno State for 17 years.

In 2017/2018, Daniel was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Ghana and lived in Accra with her family. She taught print and broadcast journalism to graduate students and assisted them with producing a live radio news show. She also started an oral history project on journalists who worked during Ghana’s transition from a dictatorship to a democratic republic. A Fulbright Regional Travel Award allowed her to teach journalism seminars at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. 

Daniel is married to Ben Boone, a composer, jazz saxophonist and professor at Fresno State. They have two teenage sons who attend Edison High School.

Sometimes courageous, noble, hard-working people grab the headlines -- but most of the time their work goes unnoticed by the public. They’re the teachers, organizers, artists, and more who help to make places like Fresno better. Well, now some of these local heros are being celebrated -- in a new portrait series that opens at Arthop Thursday Feb. 7 and runs for three months at Bitwise South Stadium. The show is called Unmasked and it’s the brainchild of photographer Enrique Meza and Bitwise CEO and co-founder Jake Soberal .

Courtesy Yonsei Memory Project

On Saturday Feb. 9, a group of writers, educators and artists will tell personal stories about social injustice in front of an audience at Fresno State's Madden Library from 2-4 p.m.. It’s called Storytelling for Change and it’s part of a larger effort to get people talking about present day civil liberties struggles and how they connect to the Japanese American incarceration during WWII. We recently spoke to Brynn Saito and Nikiko Masumoto, the architects of The Yonsei Memory Project.

On this week’s Valley Edition: The federal government issued deportation orders to a veteran who served six years in the Navy. He’s got a checkered past, but he says he’s making up for it. We also look at an unusual business started by a Valley native that some say glorifies the crimes of serial killers.

Plus: It’s been a year and a half since the City of Fresno banned camping in order to reduce its homeless population. Tent cities are less common but is the ban helping or hurting those most in need?

Courtesy of Sanders Family

For our occasional series, Over 80, Under 20, we talk to people at least 60 years apart about their personal experiences and their views on the world around them. We’re curious how generation gaps - big ones - play out in real life. For this segment, you'll hear from 83-year-old Mary Alice Sanders and her grandson, 19-year-old Ellis Flowers. I spoke with them in Mary Alice’s home in rural Fresno County.

Courtesy Luba Lukova

Luba Lukova is a New York-based artist and designer whose work conveys powerful messages about social injustice with an aim toward creating empathy and action. Lukova’s travelling art show, Designing Justice, opens Jan. 31 at Fresno State’s Conley Art Gallery. The exhibition is presented by the Center for Creativity and the Arts and is co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Design.

 

This week on Valley Edition: We hear from the widow of a police officer who took his life last year. Now, she’s telling his story to bring attention to a leading cause of death among law enforcement.

Plus: We talk to a grandmother and a grandson - she’s 83, he’s 19 - about their takes on life, love and aging. They're part of our new occasional series, Over 80, Under 20.

Courtesy of Earl Meyers Jr

 

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

Fresno is home to a lot of Internal Revenue Service employees affected by the shutdown, so on January 10, members of the Fresno chapter of the National Treasury Employees Union held a rally to show their opposition. It was one of many held around the country. We spoke to workers who attended in Fresno, and most said they’re watching their savings dwindle and that they don’t have much of a financial back-up plan.

Listen to the interview above to hear more voices from the rally.

On this week’s Valley Edition: A plot of land in southwest Fresno that used to be a landfill is now not just a park, but a national landmark. A historian gives us the gritty details.

Plus: How are local federal employees dealing with the shutdown?  We’ll hear from Fresno IRS workers, who say they’re watching their savings dwindle.

Later we hear from renowned folk singer John McCutcheon, who’s performing in Fresno, and we catch up with arts blogger and critic Donald Munro about the shows he’s excited to watch this winter.

Alice Daniel /

Neighborhood Industries is a social enterprise. It takes a market-driven approach to business coupled with a non-profit mission to care for the environment and help people in need.

It all starts with too much stuff. The company will pick up your used clothes, stained T-shirts, old rags, ripped jeans, electronics, broken vacuum cleaners, and even random wires.  

“We have routes that service Fresno specifically. But we also service about 320, 330 donation bins between Bakersfield and Sacramento,” says CEO Anthony Armor.

On this week’s Valley Edition: Valley Public Radio gets trashy. Do you ever think about what happens to all of your garbage and recyclables? Well, some California cities are getting creative. And what about all of that ridiculous stuff piling up in your garage? There’s a company that wants it.  

We also explore a recycling program in Bakersfield with some novel - and controversial - labor practices.

Plus: Why is so much medical equipment thrown out before it’s expired? A Clovis organization is repurposing supplies from this enormous industry.

Dorothea Lange / Library of Congress

While some valley congressional districts flipped from red to blue, much of the state’s remaining republican strongholds are still in the San Joaquin Valley -- particularly Kern, Madera and Tulare Counties. This has a lot to do with the Dust Bowl, and the migrants who came to California in the 1920s and 30s. In fact, there’s a link between support for Republican candidates in the 2018 midterms and the degree to which a county’s population came from Dust Bowl states.

On this week’s Valley Edition: What does the Dust Bowl have to do with the 2018 midterm elections? A political scientist working in Abu Dhabi connects the dots.

We also learn about a program that empowers African American women in the valley to advocate for their own health. And, the 21st congressional district just flipped. How did forecasters get it wrong?

Listen to the show above to hear that and more.

Alice Daniel

We're introducing an occasional series called Mind the Gap, where we ask people at least 60 years apart in age for their take on topics both personal and political. For our first Mind the Gap, you’ll meet Raymart Catacuton. He’s 18, attends Fresno City College and works at a thrift store in the Tower District. And you’ll hear from Rose Marie Carillo. She’s almost 80, and she’s very active in her church where her husband of 59 years was the pastor. She says it's been tough since he died, back in September. One way she passes the time is to shop in the same thrift store where Raymart works.

On the next Valley Edition: When you think brain drain, do you think...Hanford? A recent Bloomberg article said this small farming town is at the top of the list. We head to Kings County to find out what’s really going on in terms of education and opportunity.

We also learn about a new program to fight domestic violence in the Valley, and visit a flu shot clinic to determine what’s fact and what’s fiction about this effective but highly polarizing vaccine.

It’s the week after Thanksgiving -- a time to fill up on leftovers, so to speak. On today’s show, we’re going to look inside our proverbial fridge and pull out some of our favorite stories from this year. You’ve heard of Mr. Potato Head? One of our features places him front and center.  We also revisit a woman who has run into new roadblocks seeking asylum in the U.S.

Courtesy of Don Simmons

Thanksgiving can make us think about how to give back -- maybe it’s serving food at a homeless shelter or donating canned goods. But what about the rest of the year? I spoke with Don Simmons, a longtime community organizer and professor in the Humanics program at Fresno State about the prevailing needs in the Central Valley and how to get involved.  

Listen to the interview above to hear Simmons talk about the Humanics program, and how to find ways to better serve your own community. In his words, it can be as simple as taking a walk and talking to people.

Alice Daniel / Valley Public Radio

Last week, at the Lanna Coffee Company in Downtown Fresno, entrepreneurs pitched their business ideas to judges. It was all part of the Spark Tank Pitch Fest put on by Fresno Pacific’s Center for Community Transformation. Each business presented its idea to create social good, from an app to teach financial education, to a program that teaches marketing skills to youths. By the end of the competition, the judges awarded all five contestants from $1,500 to $4,000 to start or grow their social impact businesses.

On today’s show, we look at how the San Joaquin Valley’s cultural diversity has influenced Thanksgiving traditions--and food. We also speak with a humanics professor about how to incorporate more giving into our lives. And, as wildfires force tens of thousands of Californians to face Thanksgiving without their homes or loved ones, we learn about the risk of wildfire in our part of Central California. We also hear from local companies looking to invest in social good.

On this week’s Valley Edition, we explore the consequences of last week’s elections, including embattled Measure P, a sales tax that would have improved Fresno’s depleted park system but was voted down. We also look inside Tulare Regional Medical Center, which is open again after a year of licking its wounds and trying to move beyond its scandalous past. Later, we honor Veterans Day by hearing from residents of a veterans home in Fresno.  Listen to the audio above to hear that and more.

 

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