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Alice Daniel

News Director

Alice Daniel is News Director for Valley Public Radio. Daniel has a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and more than 25 years of experience as a print and radio journalist.

As a correspondent for KQED’s The California Report, Daniel covered the Central Valley from Stockton to Bakersfield and beyond.

In addition to her broadcast and newspaper work, Daniel has been a lecturer in the Department of Media, Communications and Journalism at Fresno State for 17 years.

In 2017/2018, Daniel was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Ghana and lived in Accra with her family. She taught print and broadcast journalism to graduate students and assisted them with producing a live radio news show. She also started an oral history project on journalists who worked during Ghana’s transition from a dictatorship to a democratic republic. A Fulbright Regional Travel Award allowed her to teach journalism seminars at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. 

Daniel is married to Ben Boone, a composer, jazz saxophonist and professor at Fresno State. They have two teenage sons who attend Edison High School.

On this week’s Valley Edition: Oildale has a reputation as an epicenter for drugs like heroin and meth. And yet, fatal opioid overdoses appear to be dropping. We hear from health professionals and community leaders about why—and whether the change can last.

We also talk to a Fresno Bee reporter about how social justice groups have been making their mark on city politics, and a historian on how Fresno’s soccer history is intricately tied to the experiences of migrants.

Plus: How a community garden in Madera County is helping some disenfranchised women grow, too.

Alice Daniel

Today on Valley Edition, we're taking you to Fresno's Chinatown. And we're starting at Chef Paul's Cafe.

People come from all over the state to try Chef Paul Pearson's recipes but the cafe is only open because someone bet him $1,000 that he couldn't keep a restaurant afloat in Chinatown.

Moderator Kathleen Schock talks with three people invested in Fresno's Transformative Climate Communities plan -- it’s an effort that affects Chinatown and Southwest Fresno.

Alice Daniel

There are signs the historic, three-story Buddhist temple in Fresno’s Chinatown is coming to life again.

There’s a newly erected metal fence around the property, a few cars in the parking lot and inside the ordination hall, the sounds of voices chanting in unison.

On this week’s Valley Edition: We take you to Fresno’s Chinatown where we meet the new owners of a century old Buddhist temple.

Plus, high-speed rail construction has closed off three roads leading into this historic neighborhood. Local business owners tell us what that means for them, today and into the coming decades.

And what does $70 million in cap and trade funding mean for Chinatown? We also tell you about Japanese pastries, shrimp and grits, sukiyaki and a longing for chile rellenos.

Hanford Police Department

It’s November 27, 2017  at about 3 p.m. when Hanford Police Officer Jeff Davis first hears a dispatch about a deadly shooting in the small Central Valley town of Lemoore.  Minutes later, he notices a blue Dodge Charger at a traffic stop. He checks the license plate numbers against those he’s written on his hand from the BOL or Be on the Lookout.

On today’s Valley Edition: Records released under California’s new police transparency law, are giving the public an unprecedented look into how officers decide when to use force. We peel back the layers on one officer-involved shooting in Hanford. We also look at a program that’s reduced gun violence in other California cities - and some hope it could do the same in Fresno. Plus: We talk to the Fresno Bee’s political reporter about following the business interests of a local congressman.

On this week’s Valley Edition: We learn what one man’s near-death experience with a rare disease can tell us about the healthcare system. And what is the city of Fresno doing about human trafficking?

Plus, a look back at the history of corruption in the Fresno Police Department, and an equal pay case that recently made its way to the Supreme Court.

Listen to those stories and more from the podcast above.

Central California Women's Facility

Today in our studio, we talk to two formerly incarcerated women, Anna and Angel, about the difficulties of finding work and housing and re-establishing familial relationships after getting out of prison.  

On this week’s Valley Edition: We hear about a lesser-known figure in the farm labor movement. She was there before Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, and now, union organizer Maria Moreno’s story is being memorialized in a new documentary film.

Plus, there’s a new state program that tackles mental health issues for the homeless while  also focusing on housing. But success isn't easy.

And later, we talk to two women who spent decades in prison and are now grappling with the near constant challenges and prejudices of life after incarceration.

Alex Emslie/KQED

A new police transparency law, SB1421, requires police departments to make public internal investigation records regarding officer misconduct and use of force. Now more than 30 news agencies statewide, including Valley Public Radio, are collaborating to request and report on these records. I spoke with Alex Emslie, a criminal justice reporter at KQED who helped spearhead the project.  

 

On this week’s Valley Edition: More than half of California’s olive groves are right here in the San Joaquin Valley. But Tulare County growers say that with a major olive cannery set to buy more Spanish olives, the future for olive production looks grim.   

Plus, it’s Women’s History Month. We sat down with three young, dynamic leaders to ask about the women who inspire them.

And later, we learn more about President Trump’s plans to rewrite rules that govern water allocations and infrastructure in the San Joaquin Valley.  

Alice Daniel

More than half of California’s olive groves are right here in the San Joaquin Valley. But Tulare County growers say that with a major olive cannery set to buy more Spanish olives, the future for olive production looks grim.   

Alice Daniel

How do teachers even become interested in teaching, how do districts recruit them and what goes into trying to hire teachers that reflect the diversity of Valley classrooms? Today in the studio, moderator Kathleen Schock speaks with Tamela Ryatt, a photography teacher who just won Fresno Unified’s high school Educator of the Year, Laura Alamillo, Interim Dean of the Kremen School of Education at Fresno State and Tiffany Samuel, who works in teacher development for Fresno Unified.

Alice Daniel

For many adults, public speaking is terrifying. Well, the Peach Blossom Festival at Fresno State helps thousands of elementary school students each year tackle this fear early on by performing -- and interpreting -- poems and stories to an audience. Valley Public Radio’s Alice Daniel has this audio postcard from a classroom in Dinuba prepping for the festival. It takes place March 14th and 15th.

On this week’s Valley Edition: The Valley air district is facing scrutiny for how it manages pollution from local industries. Air quality advocates wonder: How well is the program working?

Plus, Fresno County is considering the Voter’s Choice Act Model for the 2020 election, which could mean fewer polling locations, but more days to cast your ballot. We’ll hear from one neighboring county that’s already made the switch.

Courtesy of The Rogue Festival

Fresno's 10 day Rogue Fest is one of the longest running fringe festivals in the world and it's happening this week in the Tower District. There's music, theater, dance, spoken word and magic. We asked three Rogue performers to join us live in our studio: Marcel Nunis, the founder of Rogue, Heather Parish, the former executive director and Donna Kay Yarborough, a returning performer from Portland, Oregon. 

Courtesy of Times-Delta archives

Late in 2018, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a complaint against the Visalia Unified School District for violating the 1964 Civil Rights Act. According to the ACLU, African American students said their white peers referred to them as slaves and joked about hanging them from trees. Two reporters from the Visalia Times Delta decided to look back at the city’s racially charged past starting with a Ku Klux Klan convention in 1931. We spoke with reporters James Ward and Calley Cederlof.

On this week’s Valley Edition: There’s no summer school for kids in Bakersfield this year. We ask the superintendent why not. Plus, a new report details the poor living conditions of detention centers in California, but some immigration attorneys say keeping Mesa Verde open in Bakersfield is a good thing.

And later, one of the longest running fringe festivals is happening right now in Fresno. We talk to the founder of Rogue Fest, and hear from some of the performers.

Courtesy of Anne Lopez Gaston

And now we’re going to introduce you to some people whose families have been in the Valley for a century or more. Moderator Kathleen Schock talks to two other long-time Fresnans, Dorythea Cooley-Williams and Anne Lopez Gaston about the obstacles and hard work their families faced that allowed later generations to prosper. They’re joined by Fresno State historian Michael Eissinger.

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