Alice Daniel

News Director

Alice Daniel is News Director for Valley Public Radio. Daniel has a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and more than 25 years of experience as a print and radio journalist.

As a correspondent for KQED’s The California Report, Daniel covered the Central Valley from Stockton to Bakersfield and beyond.

In addition to her broadcast and newspaper work, Daniel has been a lecturer in the Department of Media, Communications and Journalism at Fresno State for 17 years.

In 2017/2018, Daniel was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Ghana and lived in Accra with her family. She taught print and broadcast journalism to graduate students and assisted them with producing a live radio news show. She also started an oral history project on journalists who worked during Ghana’s transition from a dictatorship to a democratic republic. A Fulbright Regional Travel Award allowed her to teach journalism seminars at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. 

Daniel is married to Ben Boone, a composer, jazz saxophonist and professor at Fresno State. They have two teenage sons who attend Edison High School.

Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders sat down for a brief interview with Valley Public Radio before he addressed a large crowd outdoors at Fresno City College Friday.  He  spoke with News Director Alice Daniel and FM89s Kathleen Schock about climate change and the Green New Deal for Public Housing Act, which aims to transform public housing into energy efficient homes. He also addressed DACA, education reform, unsafe drinking water and air pollution in the Valley.

In early 2019, reporters from the Investigative Reporting Program at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism obtained a list of criminal convictions through a Public Records Act request of nearly 12,000 current or former law enforcement officers and people who applied to be in law enforcement over the past decade.

On this week's Valley Edition, we go up in the air for an aerial view of Kern County’s Cymric Oil Field. And on the ground in Tulare County, will a village of tiny homes help solve the homeless crisis? 

You may know McFarland for the Disney movie about an against-the-odds cross country track team winning the state championship. But now the town is in the spotlight for a different reason - two investigative reporters tell us about its “second chance” police department. 

 

On this week’s Valley Edition: The first African American park superintendent was instrumental in building a wagon road into Sequoia National Park back in 1903. Now for Veterans Day, a portion of Highway 198 will be renamed for this dynamic Colonel.

We also take you to Tulare County where a dynamic mother-daughter team advocates for infrastructure improvements and basic needs, like drinkable water, in unincorporated communities.

Fresno Filmworks

And now for the Weekend, today marks the start of Fresno Filmworks' 15th annual Fresno Film Festival at The Tower Theater. The three-day event includes such films as the political documentary Raise Hell, The Life and Times of Molly Ivins about the Texas maverick and national political commentator known for her razor-sharp wit.

Alice Daniel / KVPR

   

Ashlee Arteaga squats down near the pale pink blooms. I’m cutting all the roses that are already dead,” she says. The 11-year-old  navigates her clippers swiftly along the thorny stems.  “I’ve done this a lot of times,” she adds with a bit of authority in her voice.  

There are 4000 rose bushes, and 250 varieties, to care for here at the Bravo Lake Botanical Garden. That’s not to mention zinnias, wisteria, hibiscus, sunflowers, lavender and ornamental peppers: one called Medusa starts out yellow, then turns orange, then red.

Victoria Reeder, Save the Redwoods League

A Bay Area conservation group has signed a deal to purchase the world’s largest privately owned giant sequoia forest in the Southern Sierra Nevada. FM89's News Director Alice Daniel spoke with Sam Hodder, president and CEO of Save the Redwoods League.

 

On this week’s Valley Edition: California is trying to manage its groundwater better, but some communities, already grappling with unsafe drinking water, worry they’ll be left behind by local agencies to fend for themselves.

And a Bay Area conservation group just purchased the world’s largest privately owned giant sequoia grove: 530 acres of pristine forest.

Plus: We hear from journalists about two upcoming projects. One of them is run by young women throughout the state, the other is an effort to improve education reporting in Fresno. 

Courtesy of Vijay Gupta

 

Vijay Gupta played with the LA Philharmonic for 11 years joining it at the age of 19. That was before winning a 2018 MacArthur Fellowship, also known as a genius grant. And he’s the founder of Street Symphony, an organization that performs free concerts for LA’s homeless community and in county jails.  Next Thursday, Gupta will perform and speak at the Fresno Arts Council’s 34th annual Horizon Awards at the Tower Theater. Today he joins us by phone from Los Angeles.   

 

 

 

On this week's Valley Edition: Two violent incidents shook the Sikh community in Bakersfield this year; now a women’s group is running a resource hotline in English and Punjabi.

And one father in Fresno who lost two children to gun violence has a strategy for fighting it in his own neighborhood. Is it working? We follow him to find out.

On this week’s Valley Edition: When it comes to California’s overhaul of groundwater management, many small farmers are wondering: When will they get a seat at the decision making table?

Also, Bakersfield may take a different approach to the homelessness crisis by using empty jail beds to enforce drug laws. 

Plus: We dig deep into the Bakersfield Sound with a new 10-CD collection. 

Listen to those stories and more in the podcast above.

On this week’s Valley Edition: The dairy industry has been called upon to dramatically reduce its greenhouse gas emissions - and thanks to a technology called methane digesters, it’s looking like it will get there. 

We also visit one company that’s keeping the tradition of neon alive in the Valley, one fluorescent tube at a time.

Plus: We look into Kern County’s rising fees to access court documents, and we speak with a handful of the Valley’s youngest politicians about why they chose to run for office in their early twenties.

On this week’s Valley Edition: What does a 16th century Albanian village in Italy have to do with one of the longest running religious celebrations in the Valley? We find out at the annual St. Elia celebration in West Fresno.

 

We also hear how a scientific study on emotional support helped Valley women get through breast cancer - and may help reduce health disparities among ethnic groups.

Later, we explore the politics of homelessness, and why Sacramento hasn’t been tougher on vaping. 

Courtesy of Thomas Olsen / Bakersfield Museum of Art

Bakersfield is well known in the arts for its contributions to country music, notably the Bakersfield Sound. But it’s not as well recognized for its architecture. A new exhibit at the Bakersfield Museum of Art may help change that. It’s called Bakersfield Built: Architecture of the 1960s. Several events are being held in conjunction with the show, including a symposium and guided tour of modern homes this Saturday, September 21.

On this week’s Valley Edition: The award winning musical Hamilton! In San Francisco, the iconic role of George Washington is now being played by a Central Valley native. We talk to actor Darnell Abraham about his journey to the stage.

And why does Bakersfield have such great modern architecture? It's a two-pronged answer that includes an innovative high school teacher and the 1952 earthquake. We learn more about Bakersfield Built: Architecture of the 1960s.

James Gathright

James Gathright is a designer, writer and photographer living in Fresno, California. In 2016 he was diagnosed with Renal Cell Carcinoma. Since then, taking pictures has been an integral part of his therapy. It helps him cope with the disease and gets him out of the house. And as a result, he has produced a digital book of 100 photos. It’s called I Was Born in a Small Town: Street Photography in the Shadow of Cancer.

On this week’s Valley Edition: September is National Suicide Prevention Month. We bring you the story of one Kern County woman who says helping someone in need could be as simple as asking questions. 

 

We also tell you about the 30th annual Reel Pride Film Festival coming up next week. It’s the sixth-longest-running LGBTQ film festival in the country.

 

And we meet a man whose street photography helps him cope with cancer.

Listen to those stories and more on the podcast above.

Courtesy of Nikiko Masumoto

The writer Gerald Haslam grew up at the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley and is credited with coining the phrase "The Other California" to describe the part of the state where we live. Not Los Angeles. Not San Francisco. Not the coastal California but The Other California -- a unique, highly diverse region with its own stories to tell. Over the next few months we’ll be developing a podcast called The Other California that looks at the people, places and themes that make this region stand out as different from the rest of the state.

Ezra David Romero / KVPR

 

The Friant-Kern Canal, which delivers water to farms and communities on the east side of the Valley, is literally sinking in some areas due to groundwater pumping. And with one week to go before the California legislature wraps up its 2019 session, many hope the state will help fund the canal’s repair.  FM89's News Director Alice Daniel recently sat down with Johnny Amaral, the chief of external affairs for the Friant Water Authority to learn about one possible solution. 

 

On this week’s Valley Edition: caring for a child with acute mental illness can be really difficult especially when resources to keep the child safe are limited. We get feedback from parents and profressionals.

We also dig into why the Selma City Council wants to get rid of at-large voting and map out districts. And the Friant-Kern Canal delivers water to farms and communities on the east side of the Valley but excess groundwater pumping is causing it to sink in some areas. We hear about one possible, but expensive, fix.

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