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Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Mount Whitney is the tallest peak in the lower 48 states. But at over 14,000 feet, hiking the mountain is anything but routine, especially in early summer. In a new piece on the website Outdoor Online, journalist Megan Michelson writes about her own close call on the mountain thanks to climbers who were unprepared. She also talks about a growing culture of selfie-induced "summit fever" which she says is making it unsafe for others on the mountain.

Courtesy of the Sun-Gazette

The arrest of the man suspected of being the Golden State Killer shocked the nation last week. 72-year-old Joseph James DeAngelo is accused of being behind a string of murders, rapes and robberies that have been attributed to a suspect also known as the East Area Rapist and the Original Night Stalker.

Joe Moore / KVPR

Thousands gathered this weekend for a festival to mark the reopening of six blocks of Fulton Street that once made up the pedestrian-only Fulton Mall. The multi-million dollar reconstruction project was one of the most controversial in recent local memory, with critics on all sides. Some claim the new street won’t help revitalize the area, at the same time as others say it will cause gentrification, driving away existing businesses that cater to the largely Latino shoppers who never left downtown.

Courtesy Rei Hotoda

It's a new era for the Fresno Philharmonic as Rei Hotoda, the new music director and conductor of the orchestra, is set to lead the orchestra in her first concert with that title Sunday October 15 at the Saroyan Theatre. Valley Edition host Joe Moore caught up with about what to expect. To listen to the interview click play above. 

Hotoda was the Associate Conductor of the Utah Symphony Orchestra, and has held assistant conductor roles at orchestras in Dallas and Winnipeg. She says she is excited to lead the Philharmonic as its next conductor. 

Dwight Kroll / City of Clovis

California is the in the middle of a housing crisis. With the cost of home ownership rising, city leaders in Clovis are considering the introduction of smaller homes as a solution. They have approved a new program that aims to clear the way for residents in Downtown Clovis to build what they call “cottages” along alleyways.