StoryCorps

StoryCorps

In February and March, the StoryCorps mobile 2020 tour was in Fresno and Bakersfield documenting the stories of San Joaquin Valley residents. As part of Valley Public Radio’s collaboration with the personal history project, we’ll be producing segments over the next year based on some of these recorded conversations. Today you’ll hear from two religious leaders in Fresno: Rabbi Rick Winer of Temple Beth Israel and Reza Nekumanesh, executive director of the Islamic Cultural Center.

This week on Valley Edition: COVID-19 cases are on the rise in California, but what does that mean for the San Joaquin Valley? We learn how the disease is affecting our healthcare system, education and the economy and we get some advice on how not to panic. 

We also interview an author whose latest book was inspired by murders in the 1980s committed by the so-called “Lords of Bakersfield.”

And, we check in with StoryCorp San Joaquin. You’ll hear the first of many segments  coming straight from the Valley.

 

StoryCorps

Valley Public Radio has partnered with the personal history project StoryCorps and its 2020 mobile tour. Since February 12, StoryCorps has been in Fresno and Bakersfield documenting the stories of residents in the San Joaquin Valley. As part of our collaboration, we’ll be airing segments over the next year based on some of these recorded conversations.   

Kerry Klein

If you’re a regular NPR listener, you probably know StoryCorps. It’s a weekly radio show that produces uniquely poignant, intimate interviews. “The summary that I always give participants is that we’re a non-profit that travels the country and collects people’s stories as part of adding to this oral history that we have,” says Ava Ahmadbeigi, site manager for the organization’s mobile storytelling booth.

On this week's Valley Edition: There's only one proposition on the ballot this year, Proposition 13. Some say it will deepen state debt, while others think it’s the fix for California’s aging schools.

Plus: We’ll speak to a California native who served in two presidential cabinets. Secretary Norman Mineta was pivotal in convincing the U.S. government to formally apologize to Japanese Americans after their internment during World War II. 

 

StoryCorps Mobile Tour Launch Event In Fresno

Feb 11, 2020
CMAC

Join us for the StoryCorps opening ceremony Wednesday, February 12, 2020, 11:30AM at CMAC in Fresno

StoryCorps, a renowned nonprofit organization celebrating the stories of everyday Americans, will record interviews in the San Joaquin Valley from February 12 to March 20 as part of its cross-country MobileBooth tour. Having collected over 65,000 interviews from Americans in all 50 states, StoryCorps has gathered one of the largest single collections of human voices ever recorded.

StoryCorps trailer
Ryan Dorgan

UPDATE 3/11/20: Out of an abundance of caution due to the Coronavirus situation, the StoryCorps San Joaquin listening event previously scheduled for March 19, 2020 has been cancelled, and will be rescheduled to a new date later in the year. 

StoryCorps Legacy

Regular listeners to NPR are familiar with the concept of the Segment StoryCorps. The organization records thousands of conversations between family members and loved ones each year. Through the group’s StoryCorps Legacy program, the organization works with hospice organizations across the country, including Hinds Hospice in Fresno. In this story Emily Stuart interviews her grandmother Dorothy Stuart about approaching the end of her life.

DOROTHY STUART: “I’m a colorful person. I used to have magenta hair before magenta hair was in.”

Hinds Hospice

Regular listeners to NPR are familiar with the concept of the segment StoryCorps. The organization records thousands of conversations between family members and loved ones each year.

Valley Public Radio

On this week's Valley Edition: Governor Brown has declared a new state of emergency in California. But it’s not involving a wildfire or a mudslide – it’s actually about the massive die-off trees in the Sierra. We’ll find out what local forestry officials doing scrambling to keep visitors safe. Later in the show we’ll talk about a new opinion piece in the New York Times that suggests California’s best days are behind it. Is the California dream turning dark, or is the state about the reinvent itself once again?