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In The Studio: A Look At The New York Times' 1619 Project

Aug 30, 2019
Dannielle Bowman / New York Times (screenshot)

Earlier this month The New York Times Magazine marked the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to the shores of Virginia with “The 1619 Project.” This collection of essays, photographs and poetry explores how slavery, and its aftermath, continue to shape the nation. Moderator Kathleen Schock got reaction to the project from Dr. Paula Parks, professor of English at Bakersfield College, Drs. Ethan Kytle and Blain Roberts, professors of history at Fresno State, and Dorothy Smith, a retired educator and community activist.

The Civil War ended over 150 years ago, but the battle over interpreting it has never really stopped. A new book by Fresno State history professors Ethan J. Kytle and Blain Roberts looks at the way attitudes and interpretations of the war and slavery have changed over the decades in Charleston, South Carolina.

Segment 1: Human Trafficking - On Monday the US State Department released a report that estimates that up to 100,000 people in the US are victims of human trafficking. They range from those working in forced labor, to women and children trapped in the world of sex trafficking. California is one of the top three states in the nation for human trafficking, according to Cal EMA. Joining us to talk about the extent of this problem in the San Joaquin Valley is Ronna L. Bright, from the group Central Valley Against Human Trafficking and the Central Valley Freedom Coalition.