Prop 13

Olivia Allen-Price, Jeremy White, Ben Christopher and Mark Trezza

As the November 3rd election deadline draws near, Valley Public Radio continues its look at the propositions before voters. Joining Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock for a conversation about the potential changes to rent control, property taxes, data security, and how the state charges theft-related crimes are Ben Christopher, election reporter for CalMatters, Olivia Allen-Price, host of KQED’s Bay Curious podcast, Jeremy White, California political reporter for Politico and Mark Trezza, political science instructor at Fresno City College.

Scott Rodd, Alyssa Dykman, Ben Christopher and Ivy Cargile

Propositions 13 and 209 were some of the most impactful in California's history, but now their fates are back in the hands of voters, who come November will weigh in on whether to bring back affirmative action and potentially increase property taxes for some businesses.

Julie Boesch

The sole proposition before voters in March is Proposition 13, a $15 billion bond that would help to upgrade the state’s K-12 schools, colleges and universities. FM89's Kathleen Schock talked about the measure’s potential impact, and its confusion with the 1970s property tax law, with Calmatters reporter Ricardo Cano, Fresno State political science professor Jeff Cummins, and Julie Boesch, Superintendent of Maple Elementary School District in Kern County.

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

We want to tell you about a property tax measure that’s coming up on the November 2020 ballot. It has its share of big backers but opponents say it will burden businesses and county assessors. The goal of the measure? To help recoup the loss of funding to schools and public services that was the result of a controversial proposition passed 41 years ago.

 

On this week’s Valley Edition: The Trump Administration has come one step closer to allowing fracking on some federal lands in the Valley. We’ll dive into the plan - and find out how locals feel about it.

Also, a 2020 ballot measure could generate more revenue for schools and public services, but one county office worries, implementation will be costly. And later, we talk to middle school students from Chowchilla about a podcast they created.

Listen to those stories and more on the podcast above.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

California homeowners who saw their property taxes plunge along with their homes’ market values during the recession could get some sticker shock when their next tax bill arrives.  As Ben Adler reports from Sacramento, the bad news for homeowners is good news for state and local budgets.

Democrats Pushing to Limit Prop 13

May 16, 2013
Photo used under Creative Commons from Andy Patterson / Modern Relics / http://www.flickr.com/photos/modernrelics/4461010654/

Some Democrats at the Capitol are attempting to chip away at California’s fabled Prop 13. But supporters of the property tax limiting measure are digging in to fight back. Katie Orr reports from Sacramento.

Proposition 13 limits property taxes in California. But it also requires a two-thirds vote of the public to increase any special taxes. Six Democratic sponsored bills making their way through the Senate would lower that voter requirement to 55 percent approval.

High Stakes for Jerry Brown with Prop 30

Nov 1, 2012
Jerry Brown
Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

When the results for Proposition 30 come in on Election Night, California voters won’t just have returned a verdict on whether they support raising taxes to reduce the state’s budget deficit. They will also have handed Governor Jerry Brown a victory or defeat on his signature policy issue. As Ben Adler reports from Sacramento, the outcome, and Brown’s reaction to it, could shape the rest of his time in the governor’s office.

Part I: Prop 13 - Thirty three years ago, California voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition 13 into law, ushering in a new era of California politics and forever changing state and local government. Not only did the constitutional amendment cut property taxes nearly in half, its implementation also ushered in a major change in the way government services are provided, in the Golden State, centralizing more power in Sacramento.

Prop 13 casts a long shadow on state, local government

Mar 1, 2011

Thirty three years ago, California voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition 13 into law, ushering in a new era of California politics and forever changing state and local government. Not only did the constitutional amendment cut property taxes nearly in half, its implementation also ushered in a major change in the way government services are provided, in the Golden State, centralizing more power in Sacramento. It also helped spark a wave of so called "ballot box budgeting" with citizens taking control of the power of the purse, in both setting tax rates and spending priorities.