Fresno Police Department

A Fresno police officer used excessive force on a black 17-year-old male during a January 2019 incident caught on camera, according to an independent auditor’s review released on Thursday.  

 

The audit says Officer Christopher Martinez continued to punch London Wallace after he was no longer resisting arrest or posed any threat to the officer. 

 

On Monday, the Fresno Police Reform Commission announced a new community survey that will assist it in making informed recommendations to the city of Fresno and its police department.

The survey asks community members questions like how comfortable would they be calling the Fresno Police for help and whether the community should have a say in the department's funding. D'Aungillique Jackson, the chair of the community input subcommittee, says the goal is to include responses from underrepresented communities. 

 

Beth LaBerge

KQED's Central Valley reporter Alexandra Hall spent more than a year investigating an Anglican priest in Fresno who some say is a miracle worker and others say is a sexual predator. The audio documentary that came from her reporting was produced for The California Report Magazine.

Fresno Mayor Lee Brand Facebook

The City of Fresno announced the 37 members of the new Police Reform Commission Friday. The city council, mayor, and mayor-elect all committed to taking the recommendations seriously. 

City of Fresno Facebook

Nearly a hundred people made public comments Monday afternoon during the Fresno City Council’s budget hearing on the city’s police department. 

Most called for the council to defund the police and redirect the money to other services like mental health. Council President Miguel Arias said thousands more residents expressed their opinions via email. 

City of Fresno Facebook

The Fresno City Council announced Thursday it’s creating a police reform commission. Council President Miguel Arias said the commission will be headed by former council member and police officer Oliver Baines.  

The news came after the council sat through a workshop about social and economic justice led by the Fresno State NAACP. 

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

Fresno Police announced today that they have arrested six suspects related to the November 17 mass shooting at a house party in Southeast Fresno that left four men dead. Although police confirmed the shooting was gang related, none of the victims themselves were gang members. 

On this week’s Valley Edition: We talk with the Fresno Police Department about the mass shooting last Sunday that left four dead and six wounded at a party in Southeast Fresno. We also visit a Hmong mini-mall and bring you a postcard of remembrances from people who knew the victims.

And we talk to kids about a father who was apprehended by Immigrant and Customs Enforcement while driving his two teenagers to school. He was then sent to a detention facility.

Alice Daniel / KVPR

At a press conference following the mass shooting that killed four and wounded six others in Southeast Fresno, Fresno Police Chief Andy Hall announced he had created an Asian gang task force, despite no definitive evidence the shooting was gang-related. Many members of Southeast Asian communities have since questioned why the police made the implicit association without definitive proof, and some worry it perpetuates stereotypes from which they’ve long sought to distance themselves.

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

  One more candidate has thrown his name into Fresno’s Mayoral Race: The Rev. Floyd Harris Jr. announced his run Monday night during a protest against Fresno police shootings. The Fresno civil rights leader says his decision was influenced by the recently released video footage from 2017 that shows a Fresno police officer shooting 16-year-old Isiah Murietta-Golding in the back of the head. That video is now the focus of a civil rights lawsuit. “We need leadership with backbone that cares about people first and has compassion,” Harris said.

Stuart Chandler

Two videos that surfaced this week of a Fresno police officer shooting a 16-year-old boy in the back of the head have caused local and national outrage. 

 

“We have to reform our policing system to end the ‘shoot first, ask questions later’ mentality that ends far too many black & brown lives,” presidential candidate Julián Castro tweeted Thursday evening. “The fact that these officers weren’t held accountable is shameful—and more evidence that the system is broken.”

 

Stuart Chandler

A recently surfaced video of an unarmed 16-year-old boy who was shot in the back of the head while running away from Fresno police is the focus of a wrongful death lawsuit.

 

The federal civil rights lawsuit was filed last March against the City of Fresno, former Police Chief Jerry Dyer, and Ray Villalvazo, the officer who shot the teen. Attorney Stuart Chandler is representing the teen’s father, Anthony Golding.

 

Fox26

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer stepped back into uniform Friday to announce a breakthrough in a 20-year-old murder investigation. At a press conference, Dyer announced that Visalia resident Nickey Stane is the primary suspect in the 1996 rape and murder of 22-year-old Debbie Dorian.

“We anticipate the arrest of Stane for that murder and rape in the very, very near future once some additional investigative work is comepleted by detectives,” said Dyer.

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

After months of community meetings and a nationwide search, city officials said today that the next man to lead Fresno's police department already works there. Protesters outside the press conference said the city’s efforts to include citizen input seem disingenuous.

Inside the City Hall Annex, Jerry Dyer’s successor as police chief was announced as Deputy Chief Andy Hall. He’s a veteran officer with more than 40 years in the department.

Monica Velez / Valley Public Radio

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer announced his run for mayor Wednesday as protestors rallied outside his press conference at the Manchester Center.

 

About a dozen protesters chanted “Dyer is a liar” and booed him as he spoke about combatting homelessness, bringing more high-paying jobs to Fresno, and uniting the city.  

 

Monica Velez

Aaron Foster stands outside Wayne's Liquor store on East California Avenue. There’s a park across the street buzzing with people, a taqueria around the corner, and a library a few blocks away.

 

“This is the heart of Southwest Fresno,” he says. “There’s rival gang members that come by but they know this is a safe zone.”

 

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

These days, Crystal Giles negotiates dinner options for her two kids alone. There’s Talon, her four-year-old son, and Riley, her eight-year-old daughter.

 

Giles moves a plate of burritos out of the microwave for Talon, and eventually settles on pizza rolls for Riley.

 

“That is way too many pizza rolls, little girl,” Giles tells her as Riley pours them out of a bag from the freezer.

Riley responds, “That’s how much daddy would eat.”

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

A few weeks ago, the Fresno Police Department put out its end-of-year data on crimes in the city over the last year, and many instances of crime went down from 2017 to 2018.

For example, homicides were down 43 percent, there were about a third fewer shootings, and violent crimes like rape and robbery were also down compared to 2017. So, if the Fresno Police Department has done such an effective job reducing crime, why was there such a big fight over Measure P?

Monica Velez

While the governor’s race heats up one top candidate made another visit to the San Joaquin Valley, where he met with locals and received endorsements from law enforcement officials.  

Fresno Police Department

The Fresno Police have determined that the fatal shooting of an unarmed 19-year-old Clovis man in June was justified. However police Chief Jerry Dyer says the shooting of Dylan Noble still raises

Noble was shot four times in a convenience store parking lot earlier this year after refusing to follow dozens of police commands to show his hands.

During a press conference Friday, Dyer told reporters that the department has determined that because Noble would not show his hands, officers were justified to use deadly force.

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