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film

Roque Rodriguez

And now for the Weekend, it’s time for Fresno’s Annual Swede Fest where amateurs and sometimes expert filmmakers take scenes from their favorite movies and remake them with friends and family using lots of household props. We hear from one of the founders, Roque Rodriquez.

 

On this week’s Valley Edition:  Why is it so difficult to find childcare in the Valley? One university looks to high school students as part of the solution.

Sometimes it’s hard to find good healthcare too, especially if you’re living in a rural area. We look at one local hospital’s efforts to increase rural access to doctors. We also talk about what it means that Fresno State’s nursing master’s program just lost its accreditation. And we catch up with three Valley teenagers lobbying their representatives in Washington, D.C. for climate change reform.

David Mueller and Lynn Salt

Four years after the Hollywood blockbuster McFarland, USA, another film is featuring a small town in Kern County. This time it’s right outside Bakersfield in the unincorporated community of Oildale.

The movie’s a fictional family drama, but the filmmakers say it pays tribute to the community’s musical heritage and its compassion – especially to its veterans. It was filmed on location in Oildale, Bakersfield National Cemetery in Arvin, and other parts of Kern County.

This Sunday, the Tower Theater will be playing about twenty sweded films on the big screen. If you haven’t heard of a “sweded” film before, it’s like a short home-remake of a real film, but as low budget as you can get: Think sheets for backgrounds, and cardboard cutouts for props.

Listen to the interview above to hear the Swede Fest organizers, Bryan Harley and Roque Rodriguez, talk about what films they anticipate playing, and what the sweded film they're making is based on.

Jimmy Chin / National Geographic

In June of 2017, a young rock climber named Alex Honnold broke a world record in Yosemite National Park, becoming the first person ever to free solo the iconic granite wall towering over Yosemite Valley. He climbed all 3,200 feet of El Capitan without a partner and without any ropes or safety gear, in a nail-biting three hours and 56 minutes.

Stand Up Republic

“Active Measures” is a documentary film that explores the history of Russian interference in elections -- including the 2016 US presidential election. It’s now playing in swing districts across the country, including a one night run this Saturday in Clovis.  

Martín Navarez

On Wednesday, the annual Reel pride Film Festival kicks off five days of films from around the world that explore LGBTQ people and issues. One of the films premiering in the festival is about a drag queen known in Fresno drag scene. She’ll share a part of herself not everyone sees on stage. Leilani Price will be featured in the documentary “The Life of Lei: The Man Behind the Makeup.” We spoke with the director, Matthew Broughton, and the queen herself, Leilani, about the film. 

For the record, Valley Public Radio is a community sponsor of the Reel Pride Film Festival. 

https://vimeo.com/122365483

David Mas Masumoto starts with a question when talking about the new documentary about his family's farm. He asks, "How many harvests do you have left?"

The Masumoto family is known throughout the country as one of the nations foremost producers of organic peaches. But also known for their literary pursuits and intellectual pursuits which combine in this new documentary "Changing Season: On the Masumoto Family Farm."

Fresno Filmworks

The historic Tower Theatre will come alive with films from across the globe as the 2015 Fresno Film Festival opens November 13. The festival put together by Fresno Filmworks will feature eight programs with 21 short and feature-length movies from 21 different countries. There will also be special filmmaker appearances, Q&A panels and more.

Jim Choi and Chihiro Wimbush / Changing Season: On the Masumoto Family Farm

  In the tiny community of Del Rey sits one of the nation's most acclaimed organic farms. The Masumoto family has been farming the land there for generations, and their heirloom peaches are sought after by the country's top chefs. But the Masumoto farm is also in transition, a transition of generations, as David "Mas" Masumoto's daughter Nikiko has returned home to work with her father and keep the farm alive for another generation. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

The United States is dominated by box office hits played at megaplexes with sometimes as many as 21 plus screens, but no more than a few decades ago film venues looked very different especially for the Latino community. But today in Fresno, one young woman has taken on the task to reopen the region’s only Spanish language theater.

Thirty years ago, the main hall of Teatro Azteca in Fresno’s Chinatown was filled with the sounds of famous Spanish language actors, singers and comedians.

Think Cantinflas, the Mexican Charlie Chaplin. 

This week on Valley Edition, we talk about the new program called Learn2Earn, the future of parks programs in the cities of Fresno and Bakersfield in an era of tight budgets, and learn about the upcoming Fresno Film Festival.

Valley Edition for April 24, 2012: