farm labor

Courtesy of Bob Fitch Photography Archive, Department of Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries

The United Farm Workers movement immediately brings to mind Cesar Chavez and Mexican laborers. And if you know your history really well, then you might also think of Larry Itliong and Filipino farm workers. But there’s another community in the Central Valley that was deeply engaged in the movement. Writer Neama Alamri has been researching the history of Yemeni farm workers as part of her doctoral dissertation at UC Merced.

Bakersfield College

This year, thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Bakersfield College has been focusing on how labor and energy have historically intersected with art and literature. To further explore this, the college is inviting Sarah Wald, a professor at the University of Oregon, to speak about it on campus. Wald has studied the relationship between race, citizenship, and nature in popular culture. She’ll be speaking at Bakersfield College on Thursday, October 18, at 7 p.m.

UCLA

The San Joaquin Valley’s farm workers are some of the hardest working people in the world. They toil for long hours in the fields to pick the food that feeds the world. While we all eat their produce, for many Americans farm workers don’t inspire admiration, but instead resentment and hostility. Anti-immigrant sentiment often revolves around the notion that undocumented workers are taking jobs that legal residents would otherwise be happy to do.