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Dolores Huerta Foundation

Monica Velez / Valley Public Radio

When Lewanne Osborn moved to the foothill community of Springville 53 years ago, the population was around 900, she said. Flip to the year 2000, and the population went up to 1,092, according to census bureau data. But 10 years later the population declined to 934. 

“In my own mind I just don’t feel like it’s an accurate number,” Obourne said. “I have seen incredible growth, houses going up everywhere, new communities that used to be just nothing but hillside and grassland.”

 

Monica Velez

Last Tuesday, some people in Kern County were hoping District 4 residents would vote for a candidate that would make the Board of Supervisors more diverse. But, it looks like the board is staying the same, with four white men and one Latina.

Although election results are unofficial, it’s more likely than not incumbent David Couch will represent District 4. As of Tuesday, he has about 45 percent of the vote and leads by about 8 percentage points.

 

Tulare County

Currently, four out of the five Board of Supervisor districts in Tulare County have a majority Latino population. On the surface, it looks like Latinos should be well represented. But dig a little deeper and the story changes.   

“What you have in Tulare and in many other communities in the Central Valley are small farmworker communities where many of the residents are not U.S citizens and if they are U.S citizens they’re not necessarily registered to vote,” says Jesus Garcia, a local demographic consultant.