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Kerry Klein / Valley Public Radio

Health disparities research around the U.S. has shown that not only do Spanish speakers tend to receive less information and support related to their health ailments than English speakers, they’re also less likely to speak up about their symptoms. Ongoing research with local ties, however, aims to close some of those gaps.

Roundup
Mike Mozart / Creative Commons / Flickr

A jury last week awarded a California man with terminal cancer $289 million dollars in a lawsuit against agri-chemical giant Monsanto. The jury agreed with plaintiff Dewayne Johnson’s claim that his exposure to the popular herbicide Roundup on the job (and its main component known as glyphosate) resulted in his non-Hodgkins lymphoma. With over $250 million in punitive damages in this one case alone, the stakes are high for Monsanto’s owner Bayer. So where does the legal fight go from here, and how does the courtroom differ from the scientific lab when determining the truth?

A Fresno judge has ruled in favor of the state in its effort to list a popular herbicide on the database of carcinogens. 

Monsanto has sued California over its decision to list glyphosate, the main ingredient of its weed-killer Roundup, as a carcinogen. As a result, property owners would need to notify the public under Proposition 65 of wherever Roundup had been used.

Clovis Community Medical Center could soon be home to a new state of the art cancer treatment facility. The Community Medical Centers board voted recently to proceed with design work on the planned $65 million facility adjacent to the current hospital.

 

Paul Ortiz is vice president of cancer services for Community. He says the goal is to consolidate all of Community’s outpatient cancer services in the new building, including those currently offered at CRMC in downtown Fresno and the California Cancer Center in north Fresno.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Arvin "Bucket Brigade"
The small Kern County community of Arvin has some of the worst air in the nation, thanks to geography and numerous pollution sources. But now some citizens are taking matters into their own hands, with a "bucket brigade" that aims to clean up the air by monitoring pollution themselves. On Sunday they gathered outside a local composting plant to protest what they call a major community polluter.  But their “do it yourself” efforts at monitoring pollution are not without controversy. Valley Public Radio's Joe Moore has this report: