Valley Public Radio - Live Audio

armona

Kerry Klein / Valley Public Radio

When the federal government reduced how much arsenic it would allow in drinking water in 2006, the water system in Jim Maciel’s Central Valley community was suddenly considered unsafe to drink. Bringing that arsenic content back down to a safe level required a lot of work, as he explains to a few colleagues at a water leadership institute in Visalia. “It took us about 8 years and $9.2 million to comply with their new standards,” he says. “And we just got that plant online in September of 2017.”

The Hanford Sentinel reports that one of the San Joaquin Valley's last drive-in movie theatres may close after the end of the summer season, thanks to a rash of vandalism, and pressures for development.