African Americans

Early on in the pandemic, the state of California put an emphasis on equity in its pandemic response, requiring specific levels of testing and outreach in disadvantaged census tracts in order for counties to advance through the state’s reopening blueprint.

Now, obstacles to vaccine access have introduced the potential for new disparities, and newly published state data shows what many have feared: that the vaccine isn’t being distributed equitably among racial and ethnic groups.

Kerry Klein / Valley Public Radio

 

It’s a Tuesday afternoon in downtown Fresno, and a line of cars has wrapped around the block from the Fresno Economic Opportunities Commission to Chukchansi Stadium. A petite karaoke singer belts out George Harrison on the sidewalk, while the drivers, masked and corralled into reserved parking spots, wait for Testing Tuesday to begin.

Whitney Pirtle, Tania Pacheco-Werner and Chet Hewitt

Earlier this week, the New York Times published an analysis of national data that found that Black and Latinx Americans are three times as likely to catch COVID-19 compared to whites. To discuss the implications of those findings, and what it means for the battle against the virus here in the San Joaquin Valley, Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with Whitney Pirtle, assistant professor of sociology at UC Merced, Dr.

In The Studio: A Look At The New York Times' 1619 Project

Aug 30, 2019
Dannielle Bowman / New York Times (screenshot)

Earlier this month The New York Times Magazine marked the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to the shores of Virginia with “The 1619 Project.” This collection of essays, photographs and poetry explores how slavery, and its aftermath, continue to shape the nation. Moderator Kathleen Schock got reaction to the project from Dr. Paula Parks, professor of English at Bakersfield College, Drs. Ethan Kytle and Blain Roberts, professors of history at Fresno State, and Dorothy Smith, a retired educator and community activist.