2018 elections

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

To get the “I Voted” sticker, you have to understand how the voting process works. And for some refugees in the Valley, it can seem really complicated. Take the Hmong community: Many of the elders fought for the U.S. in the CIA’s secret war in Laos. When they resettled in areas like Fresno, they lacked the tools to become civically engaged. But their kids and grandkids grew up here and now, a group of them are working hard to make sure their elders cast their ballots. To do that, they’re transporting voters and translating propositions.  

Jewel Hurtado

You’ve heard a lot about who’s running for office this election day -- and that includes a record number of millenials. In some districts, the California Voting Rights Act is making it easier for young people of color to be on the ballot.   

That’s  the case in the small town of Kingsburg. The town is majority white -- and the city council reflects that. But, to avoid a lawsuit, Kingsburg recently moved from at-large to district elections.

Photo used under Creative Commons from Andy Patterson / Modern Relics / http://www.flickr.com/photos/modernrelics/4461010654/

As we approach the midterm elections, we wanted to examine the health platforms of some of California’s highest profile candidates: The two men running for governor. There’s Gavin Newsom, currently the state’s Democratic lieutenant governor and the former mayor of San Francisco, who’s favored to win the election. Then there’s Republican John Cox, a businessman and former presidential candidate in southern California. What health goals are they making, and how likely are they to keep their promises?

Kern County

Lidia Gonzalez still lives in the same part of Delano she did a year ago. But even though she’s in the same place, she says one big thing is different- the district she lives in and the Kern County supervisor who represents her. 

She says it’s not just the districts that changed, but how the people in them are responding to the changes.

Laura Tsutsui / Valley Public Radio

Summers for college students usually mean part time jobs or summer school. But this year, one group of students have dedicated their time to civic engagement. While some of them are new voters themselves, they’re hoping to get other young adults to make voting a priority.