All Things Considered

Weekdays from 3:30 p.m. -6:30 p.m.

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - some. On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the five decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa ChangAudie CornishMary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

Ways to Connect

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It powers so many aspects of modern American life - electricity.

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The COVID-19 response plan that President Biden unveiled last week aims to dramatically increase the accessibility of rapid tests for the coronavirus.

The Biden administration announced it was spending $2 billion on 280 million quick-turnaround tests to be distributed to community health centers, food banks, testing sites, shelters, prisons and other congregate settings. It's also leaning on Walmart, Amazon and Kroger to sell rapid tests at wholesale cost for the next three months.

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Politicians and pop stars often come back to the same refrain.

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JANIS JOPLIN: (Singing) Freedom is just another word for nothin' left to lose.

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A debate over coronavirus vaccine requirements is underway at universities across the country. And at one university in Ohio, administrators are taking a different approach, one that itself is controversial. Ideastream Public Media's Taylor Haggerty reports.

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As President Biden laid out his plan to combat this latest surge of the coronavirus, he asked doctors to help.

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One of the biggest technological advances in Formula One racing in recent years hasn't come in the form of speed...

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Lawmakers had some tough questions today for Secretary of State Antony Blinken about the messy end of the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For a lot of workers, it's been a year of questions about the future. And that's also true of office workers, who may not be on the front lines but have still had to adjust to new realities. If you're someone who's been working from home, you might now be asking, can I continue to do so? Can I split my time between home and office permanently? NPR's Life Kit has been thinking about the shift to a hybrid work schedule and has some tips on how to make it work.

Here's NPR's Andrea Hsu.

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