All Things Considered

Weekdays from 3:30 p.m. -6:30 p.m.

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - some. On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the five decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa ChangAudie CornishMary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

Ways to Connect

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you are 50 or older and single again after a divorce or the end of a long relationship, you might be thinking about dating and feeling anxious. But it's OK. NPR's Life Kit has some tips for how to ease your reentry into the dating scene. Here's Tanya Ballard Brown.

TANYA BALLARD BROWN, BYLINE: After I divorced, the thought of dating again scared me. It turns out my reaction isn't all that unusual. Relationship expert Susan Winter says fear is part of the process.

SUSAN WINTER: You're not good at something you haven't practiced in ages.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Some people really need no introduction, especially a man who already staked his claim to be known as the greatest.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Robert E. Lee lost the Civil War, and now his statue has lost its place on Richmond's Monument Avenue. A pair of filmmakers tells the story of why both those things matter.

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LEILA FADEL, HOST:

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LEILA FADEL, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

When indie folk star José González arrived at the time to create his latest album, Local Valley, he reached for – what else – local sounds: "I took an evening, set up the stereo mic and recorded an hour of just bird songs," González says in an interview with NPR's Ari shaprio. Aside from his costars, the singer-songwriter recorded the record in the same mode, at his home studio outside of Gothenburg, Sweden, where he lives near the coast in a forest of birch and pine.

Updated September 17, 2021 at 1:03 PM ET

A debate is heating up over whether President Biden's sweeping vaccine mandate should be extended to cover those who travel domestically by plane and train.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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