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Maggie Penman

Maggie Penman is a reporter and producer for NPR. She got her start in public radio as an intern at WNYC, and has since worked on NPR's flagship show Morning Edition, reported on breaking news for the network, and helped launch the popular social science podcast Hidden Brain.

Her reporting has taken her from the North Dakota Prairie to Berlin, Germany, to a tiny town in Japan called Obama. In 2017, she reported on the German election as an Arthur F. Burns Fellow through the International Center for Journalists.

On Sunday, former Uber engineer Susan Fowler Rigetti published a post on her blog entitled "Reflecting On One Very, Very Strange Year At Uber." On her first day working on her new team at Uber, Rigetti says, her manager sent her a string of messages propositioning her on the company chat. She says she took screenshots of the conversations, and brought them to Uber's HR department, saying she expected the matter would be handled quickly and appropriately. And from her account, it was not.

Speaking at NATO headquarters in Brussels Monday, Vice President Mike Pence reassured allies that America would uphold its commitments to the organization, but added that President Trump expected "real progress" among NATO allies in stepping up their defense spending.

Defense Secretary James Mattis arrived in Iraq Monday on an unannounced visit that seemed aimed to reassure Iraqi allies. He told reporters that, despite President Trump's earlier statements to the contrary, the U.S. does not plan to seize Iraqi oil.

"All of us in America have generally paid for our gas and oil all along and I'm sure that we will continue to do so in the future," Mattis said. "We're not in Iraq to seize anybody's oil."

After weeks of uncertainty and political tension, the longtime ruler of Gambia, Yahya Jammeh, has boarded a plane to fly into exile.

Making good on his promise to get started on "Day 1," President Trump and his administration got right to work on Friday, taking steps to dismantle the Affordable Care Act and announcing the reversal of their predecessors' plans to reduce mortgage insurance premiums on federally insured home loans.

Updated at 6:10 p.m. ET

As the Women's March on Washington has swelled in support, attracting attention and supporters in the lead-up to Saturday's demonstrations, its name has become something of a misnomer.

Sister marches have been organized in all 50 states, several U.S. territories and countries around the world. They have tried to express solidarity with the aims of the original march: opposition to President Trump's agenda, and support of women's rights and human rights in general.

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