Kathleen Schock

Valley Edition host

Kathleen Schock is the host of Valley Edition. In the show, Kathleen and the Valley Public Radio news team explore issues that matter to the residents of Central California through engaging conversations and in-depth reporting.  

A Fresno native, Kathleen has a bachelor’s in international relations from the University of Southern California, a master’s degree in journalism from UC Berkeley, and a doctorate in educational leadership from Fresno State.

Kathleen has more than 20 years of experience in journalism and communications. Her background includes working as a News Associate for NBC News in New York and as a general assignment reporter for KGPE in Fresno.

In addition to her work at Valley Public Radio, Kathleen teaches journalism at Fresno City College and serves as the advisor of The Rampage, the college’s student-run newspaper.

In her free time, Kathleen likes to cook, read and explore our local national parks. She lives in Fresno with her husband Carey and step-daughter Sydney.

 

On this week's Valley Edition:  Why a state program that provides free COVID-19 hotel rooms to farmworkers is going largely unutilized.  

Plus Pulitzer Prize winning journalist John Branch tells us how wildfires and climate change are endangering California’s most iconic trees.

And a cornerstone of the Armenian community, Hye Quality Bakery, has closed its doors.

Jackie Botts, Kate Cimini and Georgia Gee

In an effort to assist farmworkers who test positive for COVID-19, California launched the Housing for the Harvest program. It provides free hotel rooms so farmworkers can self-isolate and not infect family members. But a recent investigation found that of the 800,000 farmworkers in California, only around 80 have utilized the program since it was announced in July.

John Branch

Joshua trees, redwoods and giant sequoias are some of California’s most iconic trees, and all three have been deeply impacted by climate change and wildfires. John Branch, a Pulitzer-prize winning New York Times journalist, recently explored this issue in an article titled “They’re among the world’s oldest living things. The climate crisis is killing them.”  Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with Branch about his reporting and what the future holds for these beloved trees.

Kaiser Fresno Medical Center/AFL-CIO Websites

Amy Arlund, a registered nurse who works in the ICU at Kaiser Fresno Medical Center, spoke with Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock in May about the loss of one of her colleagues to COVID-19. With ICU capacities in the Valley now at the breaking point, Schock checked back in with Arlund to see how she is holding up.

Daniel Casarez

The nonprofit news organization Retro Report is working on a documentary project looking at the high eviction rates of three cities in the U.S., including Fresno. According to Retro Report Field Producer Daniel Casarez, the roots of Fresno’s eviction rates go all the way back to the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918 and the discriminatory practice of redlining. That’s when people of color are denied access to housing and loans within specific neighborhoods. Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with Casarez about the project.

The Fresno Center Instagram

The clock is ticking for CARES Act grants, which are set to run out at the end of the month. In Fresno, these funds helped to finance the COVID-19 Equity Project, a network of community based organizations providing COVID assistance to vulnerable communities.

UC Merced, Library and Special Collections: Ernest Lowe Photography Collection

Images captured by photographer Ernest Lowe tell the story of Central Valley farmworkers and the activists who fought for improved conditions in the 1960s. Last year UC Merced hosted an exhibition of some of those photographs, and now has acquired the complete collection - which the university has made available free to the public online.

Matt Levin, Anna Laven and Sonia De La Rosa

California Governor Gavin Newsom has a plan to use $750 million dollars of federal coronavirus relief funds to purchase motels and other properties that will be converted into housing for those experiencing homelessness. But, there’s a catch. If the properties are not purchased by the end of the year, the money goes back to the federal government.

After theatres went dark as a result of the pandemic, Fresno native turned Broadway performer Salisha Thomas launched a new project in which she explores one of her favorite topics of conversation - hair. In the new podcast Black Hair in the Big Leagues, Thomas uses hair as a launching point to discuss identity, culture and self-esteem. Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with Thomas about the project and her journey from Fresno’s Bullard High School to Broadway.

Sergio La Porta and Anna Ohanyan

Last week, Russia negotiated a ceasefire between Armenia and Azerbaijan, ending a six-week war that left thousands dead. The dispute was over Nagorno-Karabakh, a territory within Azerbaijan’s border but inhabited nearly exclusively by ethnic Armenians, many of whom are now forced to flee their homes - some reportedly burning them to the ground before they leave.

https://farai.com/

Journalist and author Farai Chideya spoke with Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock about her new podcast, "Our Body Politic," which explores how women of color experience and shape politics. Chideya, who has covered every presidental election since 1996, also shares her thoughts on the 2020 election, political division in America, and the role of objectivity in journalism. 

On this week's Valley Edition: Now that California voters have said no to the idea of restoring affirmative action, we take a look at what this will mean for public higher education.

Plus, in honor of Veterans Day, we talk to Peggy and Edward Pastana about how their bond helped them overcome an accident that recently kept them apart.

And a documentary from a UC Merced professor explores the refugee experience through the eyes of children.

Yehuda Sharim

A 2019 documentary that was directed and produced by UC Merced global arts professor Yehuda Sharim will be screened internationally over the next few weeks. The film, titled “Songs That Never End,” explores the displacement and struggle of new refugees through the eyes of two young siblings who immigrated to Houston from Iran with their family. Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke to Sharim about the project and the family featured in the film.  

Elisha Smith Arrillaga, Andrea Venezia and Dania Matos

Forty-two states in the U.S. have affirmative action laws in place, but California voters recently rejected the idea for a second time with the defeat of Proposition 16. To find out what this means for public colleges and universities, Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with Dania Matos, associate chancellor and chief diversity officer at UC Merced, Andrea Venezia, professor of public policy and administration and executive director of the Education Insights Center at Sacramento State, and Elisha Smith Arrillaga, executive director of The Education Trust-West.

On this week's Valley Edition: We unpack what happened on Tuesday by looking at partisanship in the San Joaquin Valley and discussing how the election will shape California’s future. 

Plus, we take you to the small farming town of Mendota to find out how Latinx businesses there are doing during the pandemic. Some have only survived by taking out loans. 

 

And, two sisters in Fresno share stories about their peacemaking father for San Joaquin  StoryCorps. 

Clint Olivier, Jim Boren and Amanda Renteria

Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock speaks with Jim Boren, executive director of the Institute for Media and Public Trust at Fresno State, Amanda Renteria, CEO of Code for America and Clint Olivier, former Fresno City Council member and executive director of the Business Federation of the Central Valley about how California voters decided some key issues, and how political divisiveness is affecting local politics.

Miriam Pawel

Former California Governors Pat and Jerry Brown collectively led the state for 24 years, and in that time played a significant role shaping California's courts and incarceration policies. Miriam Pawel, author of “The Browns of California: The Family Dynasty that Transformed a State and Helped Shape a Nation,” will discuss the Brown family legacy on criminal justice at a CSU Bakersfield Public History Institute event Thursday, Nov. 12. In advance of that talk, Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock speaks with Pawel about the upcoming event and her thoughts on the 2020 election.

On this week’s Valley Edition: Latinx voters are among the largest and most diverse voting blocks in California. We’ll ask our panel, how are campaigns connecting and mobilizing these voters in the final days of the election season? 

Plus we take a deeper look at proposition 23. It requires dialysis clinics to have a doctor on site at all times, but will it really improve patient care? 

We’ll also hear another segment from StoryCorps San Joaquin. 

Listen to those stories and more on the podcast above. 

Ivy Cargile, Jesse Rojas, Dora Westerlund and Adriana Saldivar

With just days to go in this election season, one key group has been drawing a lot of attention - Latinx voters. And their impact on elections is particularly important here in California, given that they make up the state’s largest ethnic group.

On this week’s Valley Edition: Election season is underway. As Valley voters cast their ballots, we discuss how a predicted high voter turnout could impact local congressional races. 

Plus, a community choir is figuring out a new way to sing together in the pandemic: in their cars with the help of an FM radio transmitter. 

We also speak with the Fresno poet who is a finalist for the National Book Award. 

Listen to those stories and more on the podcast above.

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